One-Act Overview

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This year, Blue Hill One-Act put on a new play written and directed by our own Mrs. Luke. Students received many awards with a terrific group of new and returning members.

The play called “872 Days” was inspired by a story told to Mrs. Luke by a friend at church last May. He talked about the Siege of Leningrad during World War II. He was using this historical story to illustrate altruism and the importance of giving, but Mrs. Luke made a self-note to look into the Siege. She did not know this story, so she started with a basic Google search and read the barebones facts of the Siege. This led her to an inspiring story about WWII refugees.

872 days takes place in September of 1941, Hitler and his allies surrounded and bombarded Leningrad, Russia. They cut off all supplies and bombed the food storage with the deliberate intent of starving the population.

Our One-Act team, lead by Mrs. Luke, went to the TVC contest at Harvard High School on November 14th. They were awarded TVC Runner-up. John Rouse was awarded Best Supporting Actor while, Jami Kirchner, Tanner Lemke, & Britney Toepfer got honorable mentions.

On November 19th, One Act held their annual Dessert and a Show at the high school. During this event, the New York City trip also hosts a silent auction to raise travel funds.

The group was awarded Outstanding Technical Theater in the Lincoln High School Play Festival on November 21st. They also received Acting Honors for John Rouse, Taylor Bonifas, and Ladelle Hazen. Through the tough competitions of Districts, they made 5th place. While this did not secure them a spot at state, the school is still extremely proud of the original play and how beautifully the students performed.

One-Act’s final performance will be at Hastings College at 7 P.M. (Scott Studio Theatre 710 Turner Ave in Hastings).

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Veterans Day Program

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This Tuesday, November 7th, Blue Hill Schools hosted the Veterans Day Program in honor of our local and national military veterans.

The Blue Hill American Legion & Auxiliary Post #176 sponsored and ran the program. The school is thankful for their contribution to the program, and their contributions to our country. Their Post Commander, Mr. Harlan Siebrass, conducted the program like years before.

After welcoming everyone to the program, he lead the 4 members in the posting of the colors. The band played the “Star Spangled Banner” as everyone saluted the flags. Mr. Siebrass then led the Pledge Of Allegiance. The elementary stated it loud and proud.

Siebrass introduced the Girls’ State and Boys’ State representatives. Senior, Taylor Bonifas spoke about her experiences at the Girls’ State. She reminisced about her experiences at Girls’ State and the passion girls throughout Nebraska had for politics. Trent Karr gave an inspirational speech about his experience at the Boy’s State as well. He was detailed, overviewing, and finished it out with a call to the crowd to be the best you.

After those spectacular speeches, Mrs. Drury lead the Choir in a special song to the Veterans. They sang “We Honor You,” an angel-like tribute to war veterans.

Afterwards, Mr. Siebrass introduced the last speaker of the program, Pastor Harold King. The Pastor presented the history of how Veterans’ Day came to be. Ethan Sharp, Senior, says, “I learned from the speech that Veterans’ Day was not originally called that.”

This lead to a perfectly timed song from the band. They played “Marches Armed Forces.” At the end of the song, Siebrass lead the 4 men back to retire the colors and close the program.

Trent Karr ended the experience with a final tribute. A tribute to the fallen, the wounded, and the people. With his trumpet cloaked behind the stage curtains, he honorably played “Taps.”

Mr. Siebrass thanked the people for attending and allowing them to put on this program year after year.

Friday the 13th History

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Be wary. Be scared. The Friday no one celebrates. Friday the 13th comes back around. And best of all it’s in October! One of the most “unlucky” days in the month of Halloween. But why is Friday the 13th so bad?

Though folklorists claim there is no written evidence for the superstition before the nineteenth century, the date has long been connected to notorious events in history and religion.

According to Catholic belief, one of the most significant events in their religion – the crucifixion of Jesus Christ – took place on Friday the 13th. Also, the day before was the last supper. Along with Jesus, there were 12 disciples at this meal, and Judas has come to represent betrayal and bad luck in Western societies. Even if there is no direct biblical evidence linking Judas to the 13th place at the table, the number of guests at the Last Supper and its significance in the Christian religion could have been enough to cement the idea of 13 as an unlucky number in Western cultures, particularly if this idea was promoted by the superstitious Victorians.

Geoffrey Chaucer also made reference to the apparent unluckiness of the day, recording in his Canterbury Tales that it was bad luck to start a journey or a project on a Friday.

One of the most popularised myths attempting to explain the origin of the Friday 13 superstition stems from events on Friday 13 October 1307, when hundreds of Knights Templar were arrested and burnt across France.

Ironically, the superstition of the event may be linked back to an American club that attempted to debunk the superstition surrounding the number 13 and its associated bad luck date. The Thirteen Club first met on 13 September 1881, (a Wednesday) and determined to actively flout any and all established ‘superstitions’ they knew about.  With this in mind, the group of 13 would meet on the 13 of each month, sit 13 to a table, break mirrors, spill salt with abandon, and walk under ladders – all while carefully recording how many members died. Over the years the group grew to roughly 400 members – including a number of US presidents – but the group’s notoriety just added to the date’s significance in the public psyche.

Then, in 1907, eccentric stockbroker, Thomas Lawson published a book called Friday the Thirteenth. It detailed an evil business’s attempts to crash the stock market on the unluckiest day of the year. The book was a sell-out and in 1916 made into a feature-length film.

Finally, the myth acquired the first seal of Hollywood in 1980 when Paramount Pictures released Friday the 13. Fridays would not be the same again after Jason proceeded to slash his way across a summer camp and US box offices.

So, whether you believe the superstitions or not, Friday the 13th comes with spooky connotations. Go about your day but keep your wits about you. Something bad could happen, or not.